Britain Makes Profit from non-EU students ,But No incentives No Jobs


 

JNN 03 Feb 2011 : The British government and universities across the UK are playing double-standards in their policies designed to attract more foreign students.

While British universities are trying to lure even more foreign students as valuable sources of income, the government is limiting the very students’ access to job opportunities.

Based on the latest figures, British universities are now hosting some 107,000 students from other countries, an 11 percent rise compared to last year’s enrolment data.

This comes as along with well-known universities that receive the largest portion of foreign applicants, lesser higher education centers are rushing to set up centers in London to take their share of the lucrative market as they can charge higher fees from students from other countries.

Glasgow Caledonian University for one clearly announced last year that a London base will help them appease a “predominantly international market” in postgraduate studies.

However, the students get a degree and nothing more in Britain as the government is tightening regulations to prevent the employment of British university graduates from non-EU countries.

Under current arrangements, graduates from non-EU nations can work in Britain for two years after they finish their studies but under the new plans by the government, the regulations will be subject to key changes.

According to Immigration Minister Damian Green, giving “anyone with a student visa from abroad” unrestricted access to jobs market is “putting unnecessary extra strain on our own graduates”.

Green also described the current system as “too generous” for the foreigners saying “it is quite important that we have a proper fair playing field for British graduates in the jobs market”.

He did not indicate any plans to limit the inflow of university money-spinners from other countries especially in full-time postgraduate courses where foreigners beat British students in number (132,475 to 131,590) last year.

 

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s