Al Qaeda head slams Saudi support to Egyptian Dictators


Saudi Head of Al Qaeda Ibrahim al-Rubaish (Ibrahim al-Rubaysh)JNN 1st Sept 2013 Sana : A top Saudi member of Al-Qaeda slammed King Abdullah’s support for the Egyptian army’s ouster of Islamist president Mohamed Morsi, in a video message posted online Sunday.

“One of their latest crimes is supporting the secular forces in Egypt against the government of Morsi,” Ibrahim al-Rubaish said in a statement.

Rubaish is considered the religion affairs chief of Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, the Yemen-based franchise of the jihadist network, formed in a 2009 merger of its Saudi and Yemeni branches.

“The son of Saud was the first to offer congratulations after the fall of the government of Morsi, and the most generous supporter, offering billions to the Tamarod government that rebelled against everything, including Allah,” he said.

Tamarod, or rebellion in Arabic, was the movement behind nationwide protests that preceded the Egypt military intervention to depose Morsi on July 3.

Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states welcomed Egypt’s ouster of Morsi, with Riyadh announcing an aid package of $5 billion to Egypt.

Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates followed suit, bringing the pledges made by the three oil-rich Arab states of the Gulf to $12 billion.

Analysts say Riyadh and its allies are throwing their financial and diplomatic muscle behind Egypt’s army-installed rulers because they see the political Islam espoused by Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood as a destabilising factor.

Sheikha Mahra bint Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum,

Ruler of Dubai Sh. Mohammad’s Daughter :Feel sorry for His father’s Support of the Egyptian Dictators

News websites reported that the daughter of Dubai’s ruler resented the United Arab Emirates continued support of the Egyptian army’s suppression of supporters of the deposed President Mohamed Morsi.

According to social media websites, the daughter of the ruler and Prime Minister of Dubai, Sheikha Mahra bint Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, addressed her father saying, “Sorry father, but our money is the reason for this bloodshed “on her Facebook page.

The UAE announced its support for the isolation of Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi and their support of the Egyptian forces actions against protesters over the past few days.

Please note that the post seems to have been removed from her Facebook page since then, and the Dubai Media office claims the post was a fake.

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Saudi Monarchy stands by another Egyptian Dictatorship afraid of US & Western friends implementing Democratic Revolutions


Saudi King Abdullah with Egyptian General SisiJNN 17 Aug 2013 Riyadh : Saudi King Abdullah called on Arabs to stand together against “attempts to destabilize” Egypt, in a strong message of support for the country’s military leadership read out on Saudi television on Friday. Continue reading

Saudi Royal Family Members involved in Murder to Bribery in UK , yet still under Impunity


King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia (R) and Qu

JNN 30 May 2013 London : In recent years revelations have been made concerning the involvement of members of Al Saud royal family in scandals in the UK ranging from murder to bribery despite the Saudi regime’s efforts to keep the veil of secrecy and the British government’s attempts to downplay the controversial affairs for the sake of its petro dollars.

In October 2010, a British court sentenced a Saudi prince to the maximum penalty of life in prison for murdering his servant.

Prince Saud Abdulaziz Bin Nasser, a grandson of Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah Bin Abdul-Aziz, was jailed for killing Bandar Abdullah Abdulaziz in London’s Marylebone hotel on 15 February 2010, after subjecting him to a “sadistic” campaign of violence and sexual abuse.

In March 2013, however, Britain’s Ministry of Justice confirmed that the 36-year-old royal flew back to Saudi Arabia after he was granted a transfer to a prison in his homeland.

In June 2010, British Foreign Secretary William Hague also released details of crimes diplomatic staff were accused of, citing staff from the Saudi Arabian mission being suspected of human trafficking and sexual assault.

Moreover, in July 2011, a report showed the number of foreign diplomats and embassy staff in London being arrested over crimes is on the rise, with Saudi Arabia’s embassy topping the list.

According to the figures released by the Metropolitan Police, Saudi Arabia’s mission has produced the highest number of offenders, with four of its embassy staff nabbed for drink-drive charges and another for shoplifting.

Meanwhile, in July 2012, Saudi Princess Sara bint Talal bin Abdul Aziz claimed asylum in the UK over fears for her safety back home.

The princess went to the UK in 2007 after she fell out with her 80-year-old father Prince Talal bin Abdul Aziz Al Saud.

The political asylum request, which came weeks after the death of her uncle and main supporter Crown Prince Nayef bin Abdul Aziz, who was an opponent of her father, offered an insight into the tensions within the Saudi royal family.

In August 2012, Britain’s Serious Fraud Office (SFO) opened an investigation into allegations that a British defence firm deposited millions of pounds into a bank account in Switzerland belonging to one of the members of the Saudi royal family.

The deposit was reported to have been made to ensure that British Ministry of Defence (MoD) would grant a two-billion pounds contract to GPT, a British wing of European Aeronautic Defense & Space (EADS).

The bribery allegations were first brought to light by Ian Foxley, former employee of GPT Special Project Management, who claimed he was sacked after telling the SFO that Saudi officials had been given jewellery, luxury cars and briefcases full of cash.

In 2004, the BBC revealed that secret slush funds were used by the UK’s leading arms maker, BAE Systems, to grease the wheels of the biggest arms deals in British history.

Prince Turki bin Nasser, the Saudi official in charge of the al-Yamamah deal, was found to have been the principal beneficiary of a £60 million slush fund paid through Traveller’s World, a West End travel agency.

The UK Serious Fraud Office launched an investigation into allegations of bribery relating to BAE and the Saudi royals. But the UK government stopped the probe, fearing that it could ruin lucrative arms contracts with Saudi Arabia.

The then British Prime Minister Tony Blair said in December 2006 that the fraud inquiry was being suspended as it was putting diplomatic cooperation between Riyadh and London at risk.

In 1985, the British and Saudi governments began negotiations on a series of unprecedented arms contract known as Al-Yamamah. However, allegations emerged that BAE Systems made corrupt payments totalling £6 billion to Saudi royals to secure the arms deal.

Prince Bandar, son of Prince Sultan, the Saudi Defence Minister also played a key role in negotiations for the deal. According to the reports, the deal brought more than $30 million (£15 million) to Bandar’s dollar account at Riggs Bank in Washington.

In March 2013, court papers showed Prince Mishal bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, a former defense minister, and his son Prince Abdulaziz bin Mishal, were involved in a case of London-based company that allegedly facilitated money laundering.

According to contested allegations in court documents obtained by the Guardian and Financial Times, a brother and nephew of Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz are embroiled in litigation with Jordanian businessman Faisal Almhairat over London-registered telecommunications company FI Call Ltd which they jointly owned.

 

Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah Reported Clinically Dead


Saudi King Abdullah Bin Abdul Aziz DeadJNN 27 May 2013 Riyadh : The Zionist king of Saudi Arabia has been reported clinically dead, with vital organ failure. While it has yet to be confirmed, his time is short, and the only other heirs to the throne are old, ill, inexperienced, and the first heir may suffer from dementia. Continue reading

Wife Tracker – Saudi Govt. Introduces Electronic tracking of Saudi Wives


JNN 28 Nov 2012 Riyadh : Saudi Arabia introduced an electronic tracking system that alerts men by text message when their wife is leaving the country, even if they are traveling together. The system was swiftly condemned by activists and Twitter users. Continue reading

Saudi King Abdullah Departs , The Crown Prince takes the charge of the Kingdom


 

JNN 30 Aug 2012 Riyadh : Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Salman has been tasked with running the country temporarily, while Saudi King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz is away on ‘a special leave of absence.’ Continue reading

Bickering Saudi Monarchy’s Runaway Princess Sarah seeks asylum in Britain


JNN 02 July 2012 London : Sarah Bint Talal, nephew of Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah Bin Abdul-Aziz, whose extended stay request has been rejected by the Saudi Arabian embassy in London in coordination with British authorities, has applied for asylum in the UK.

She was Saudi Arabia’s “Barbie” princess; the pampered granddaughter of the Kingdom’s founder and daughter of one of his most powerful and favoured sons.

Princess Sara bint Talal bin Abdulaziz, however, is claiming political asylum in the UK over fears for her safety back home. Continue reading

Bickering Saudi Monarchy's Runaway Princess Sarah seeks asylum in Britain


JNN 02 July 2012 London : Sarah Bint Talal, nephew of Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah Bin Abdul-Aziz, whose extended stay request has been rejected by the Saudi Arabian embassy in London in coordination with British authorities, has applied for asylum in the UK.

She was Saudi Arabia’s “Barbie” princess; the pampered granddaughter of the Kingdom’s founder and daughter of one of his most powerful and favoured sons.

Princess Sara bint Talal bin Abdulaziz, however, is claiming political asylum in the UK over fears for her safety back home. Continue reading

Saudi Monarch Appoints His Defence Minister Salman as his Crown Prince


JNN 20 June 2012  RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah has appointed his defence minister, Prince Salman, as heir apparent, opting for stability and a continuation of cautious reforms at a time of challenges for the world’s biggest oil exporter. Continue reading

The Ageing Saudi Monarchy’s 2nd Crown Prince Nayef , Dies within 8 months of its Predecessor


JNN 17 June 2012 Geneva :  Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Nayef, a Extremist  interior minister who played a pivotal role in crushing up the Shiite Minority and he is the Man,during whose tenure as an Interior Minister al Qaeda Nurtured , while now it looks that the same Al Qaida , is the Biggest threat to the Ale Saud’s Monarchy , US is Interested in Changing the faces in the New World , with new dictators , to keep its interest alive in the world’s top oil exporter. Nayef died on Saturday eight months after becoming heir to the throne, paving the way for a more reform-minded successor. Continue reading

Future of Saudi Arabia very uncertain, Ageing Monarchy May Collapse any time


ImageJNN 14 June 2012 Riyadh : Washington is reportedly gravely concerned about a possible power struggle in Saudi Arabia due to the kingdom’s ill and aging leaders including the king, crown prince and foreign minister. Continue reading

Saudi Princess Accuses Government for Corruption & Poverty in the Country


JNN 09 Sep 2011 : Saudi Princess Basma bint Saud has accused the Riyadh regime of corruption, saying a vast majority of the Persian Gulf country’s population are living in poverty, Our Correspondent Reported. Continue reading

Saudi’s Wahabi creating Sectarian Divide in Muslims to Prolong their Monarchy


JNN 30 Mar 2011 : Saudi Arabia should immediately release protesters and critics arrested and detained without charge over the past weeks, Human Rights Watch said today. More than 100 people have been arrested in the Qatif district, and about 45 in the al-Ahsa’ district, both Shia population centers in the kingdom’s Eastern Province. A smaller number of people have been arrested in Riyadh and Qasim governorates. Continue reading

Saudi's Wahabi creating Sectarian Divide in Muslims to Prolong their Monarchy


JNN 30 Mar 2011 : Saudi Arabia should immediately release protesters and critics arrested and detained without charge over the past weeks, Human Rights Watch said today. More than 100 people have been arrested in the Qatif district, and about 45 in the al-Ahsa’ district, both Shia population centers in the kingdom’s Eastern Province. A smaller number of people have been arrested in Riyadh and Qasim governorates. Continue reading

Saudi King Partnership with Zionist Giants to Buy Facebook to save his Monarchy


JNN 24 Mar 2011 : The existing social networks on the internet can no longer be reliable platforms for organizing anti-government uprisings, because zionist corporate cartels are beginning to own them, a political analyst says. Continue reading

Saudia Arabia’s future Unknown


 

JNN 28 Dec 2010 : Rex mortuus est, vivat rex! The king is dead; long live the king! For thousands of years, in monarchies across the globe, that phrase has heralded the end of one era and the beginning of another.

It is difficult for people in democracies, who elect a new chief executive every few years, to appreciate the true import of those words. But in Saudi Arabia, one of the world’s few remaining absolute monarchies, a new king is in the process of being ushered into office while his predecessor remains very much alive. And despite the ambiguity of the situation, whoever eventually occupies the Saudi throne will dramatically affect not only the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), but the entire Mideast. 

In order to fully grasp the situation, we must first understand the Saudi system of succession, which is somewhat different from that of most monarchies. Many of us are familiar with the law of primogeniture, on which the succession of most monarchs is based. According to that law, when a king dies, his eldest son inherits the throne and if that son dies without issue, the king’s next oldest son inherits and so forth. 

The Saudi monarchy, however, operates in a different manner. In the Kingdom, the order of succession (which is determined within and by the House of Saud), has been, so far, limited to the sons of the dynasty’s original founder, Abdul Aziz ibn Saud, who established the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in 1932. Since his death in 1953, five of his sons, Saud, Faisal, Khalid, Fahd and Abdullah have, in turn, occupied the throne. Thus, to date, no one but Ibn Saud and his sons has yet been king. 

Upon the death of King Fahd and the ascension to the throne of the present monarch, King Abdullah (in 2005), their younger brother, Sultan became heir apparent or crown prince. At 82 years of age, Prince Sultan is not much younger than the 86-year-old king. And considering the fact that the prince is believed to be suffering from cancer (in 2004 he was diagnosed with colon cancer), there is no guarantee that he will ever rule. 

Of Abdul Aziz’s many sons, 20 are still alive, so King Abdullah and Prince Sultan have 18 brothers. Most of them, however, are either too old to rule, or lack the experience to do so, which leaves only two brothers, who are considered eligible. They are 77-year-old Nayef and 71-year-old Salman. 

And that brings us to the controversy surrounding Prince Nayef. As the second in line after the ailing crown prince, Nayef, who now serves as Second Deputy Prime Minister (and since 1975, as Minister of the Interior), is believed by many to be the one, who will eventually occupy the Saudi throne. But unlike the moderate Abdullah, Nayef is known to be a pro-Wahhabist and one of the most conservative members of the royal family – which has given many of the more tolerant elements in the Mideast cause for worry. 

In fact, according to a 2003 New York Times article, the Minister of the Interior’s promotion of extremist elements in the past was sufficiently extensive to sound the alarm in Washington and prompt US Senator Charles E. Schumer (Democrat of New York) to write a letter to then Saudi Ambassador to the United States, Prince Bandar, asking that Nayef be removed from office due to his “well-documented history of suborning terrorist financing and ignoring the evidence when it comes to investigating terrorist attacks on Americans.” 

If those, in the inner political circles are to be believed, the ‘leopard has not changed his spots.’ As a diplomat, well-acquainted with the inner workings of the Kingdom, who preferred (for obvious reasons) to remain anonymous, recently observed, “He (Nayef) is a conservative who will give more rope to the religious establishment than any of his brothers would,” which, if true, bodes ill for internal reforms and foreign relations, alike. 

Moreover, Abdullah’s ongoing reforms aimed at solving the country’s unemployment problems and curbing extremism by improving education, making it easier for women to work and retraining sharia judges, will probably be abandoned. 

Those reform programs appear to have already given the economy a jump-start. According to an article on the NASDAQ website, they have “opened up sectors of the economy previously barred to private investors, led to the privatization of some big state companies and included development of the capital markets.” 

Such improvements will most likely be stopped in their tracks if Nayef becomes king, because the prince has, since his appointment as interior minister, 35 years ago, gained a reputation for maintaining close ties with Wahhabists (a powerful group of religious extremists), who are strongly opposed to such changes. And as author Steffen Hertog, who wrote a book about Saudi internal politics, titledPrinces, Brokers and Bureaucrats, pointed out, Nayef has already obstructed some (economic) reforms in his role as Interior Minister. 

Nevertheless, there is little doubt that he will be the next king. “It looks more plausible than not that Nayef will become the crown prince after Abdullah dies and he is already taking more control in the day-to-day running of the kingdom,” Hertog observed. 

Institute for (Persian) Gulf Affairs (IGA) Director, Ali al-Ahmad, agrees. In a recent interview with Press TV, he said, “It is true that a name, Crown Prince Sultan, for example, is in Riyadh, but he is not meeting people and he is not issuing policy.” 

“It is the third man, Nayef, who is traveling and attending Arab Countries’ on the (Persian) Gulf meetings … He is the one, who is issuing policy and orders.” 

The official went on to explain that Abdullah, due to his age and infirmities (caused by his recent surgery), is out of the picture, and there are strong doubts as to whether Sultan, who is also elderly and suffers from poor health, will ever ascend the throne. So that leaves Nayef, who is actually running the country. Ahmed went on to say that he believes the prince will use the present circumstances to “spread his power and influence to make sure that he becomes the king of Saudi Arabia,” possibly, within a matter of months. 

But what will happen when – and if – this pro-Wahhabi prince actually does become king? 

Well, firstly, it will probably help strengthen the monarchy and the House of Saud among conservative Saudi elements. Within the past decades, the royal family has, on various occasions, drawn criticism from Sunni conservatives – not only for the excess of some of its members, but for attempts by several of its monarchs to introduce modernization and tolerance. 

Therefore, since much of the dynasty’s raison d’etre stems from its affiliation with Wahhabism and its role as the guardian of Sunni orthodoxy, a conservative, pro-Wahhabi king would, in the eyes of many Saudis, exonerate the House of Saud and entrench it more firmly than ever. 

At the same time, Nayef at the governmental helm would only serve to dash the hopes of both the country’s women and its Shia population. Shias, a long-suppressed minority in Saudi Arabia, could most likely anticipate further suppression – possibly to the point of persecution. And this treatment would be based on the prevalent political climate at a given time. If the Kingdom were embroiled in a conflict with Shias in another country, Shias in Saudi Arabia would probably feel the effects in a new wave of suppression and/or persecution. 

As far as Saudi women are concerned, the meager gains they have made during Abdullah’s reign would most likely be forfeited. What else could they expect from a ruler, who, according to The Washington Institute for Near East Policy (a US think tank), publicly stated a month after King Abdullah’s announced appointment of the first female deputy minister, that he saw no need for either elections or female members of parliament? 

It might be mentioned at this point that Saudi Arabia, as an absolute monarchy, does not even possess a parliament. Instead it has a consultative ‘Shura Council,’ which is made up of exclusively male members appointed by the king. And the closest thing the Kingdom has ever had to elections, was a series of limited polls (for male participants, only), held in 2005 for some municipal councils. 

An ultra-conservative on the throne of the world’s biggest oil producer will also undoubtedly affect the country’s foreign relations, which will be felt first – and most strongly – throughout the already precarious Middle East. For starters, we can probably anticipate further Saudi interference in Iraq, Lebanon and Yemen, three countries, in which Shias have gained a foothold. 

On the other hand, there is a possibility that none of these scenarios will pan out. Despite Nayef’s hard-line reputation, historians say that Saudi leaders have always been pragmatists in their actual dealings, giving stability priority over ideology. 

And according to Hertog, Nayef’s conservatism is overstated. “As king you have to take different policy positions than as interior minister,” the expert said, “because you have a different constituency.” He went on to explain that Nayef’s opposition to reform “might have been due to security concerns and bureaucratic infighting rather than an ideological dispute.” 

There is a basis for such reasoning. Saudi Arabia is vulnerable security-wise, as assassinations and terrorist attempts in the past have demonstrated. And the rivalry and rifts within the royal family are well-known. 

So what will actually happen when Saudi Arabia gains a new king? We can only guess.

 

Saudia Arabia's future Unknown


 

JNN 28 Dec 2010 : Rex mortuus est, vivat rex! The king is dead; long live the king! For thousands of years, in monarchies across the globe, that phrase has heralded the end of one era and the beginning of another.

It is difficult for people in democracies, who elect a new chief executive every few years, to appreciate the true import of those words. But in Saudi Arabia, one of the world’s few remaining absolute monarchies, a new king is in the process of being ushered into office while his predecessor remains very much alive. And despite the ambiguity of the situation, whoever eventually occupies the Saudi throne will dramatically affect not only the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), but the entire Mideast. 

In order to fully grasp the situation, we must first understand the Saudi system of succession, which is somewhat different from that of most monarchies. Many of us are familiar with the law of primogeniture, on which the succession of most monarchs is based. According to that law, when a king dies, his eldest son inherits the throne and if that son dies without issue, the king’s next oldest son inherits and so forth. 

The Saudi monarchy, however, operates in a different manner. In the Kingdom, the order of succession (which is determined within and by the House of Saud), has been, so far, limited to the sons of the dynasty’s original founder, Abdul Aziz ibn Saud, who established the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in 1932. Since his death in 1953, five of his sons, Saud, Faisal, Khalid, Fahd and Abdullah have, in turn, occupied the throne. Thus, to date, no one but Ibn Saud and his sons has yet been king. 

Upon the death of King Fahd and the ascension to the throne of the present monarch, King Abdullah (in 2005), their younger brother, Sultan became heir apparent or crown prince. At 82 years of age, Prince Sultan is not much younger than the 86-year-old king. And considering the fact that the prince is believed to be suffering from cancer (in 2004 he was diagnosed with colon cancer), there is no guarantee that he will ever rule. 

Of Abdul Aziz’s many sons, 20 are still alive, so King Abdullah and Prince Sultan have 18 brothers. Most of them, however, are either too old to rule, or lack the experience to do so, which leaves only two brothers, who are considered eligible. They are 77-year-old Nayef and 71-year-old Salman. 

And that brings us to the controversy surrounding Prince Nayef. As the second in line after the ailing crown prince, Nayef, who now serves as Second Deputy Prime Minister (and since 1975, as Minister of the Interior), is believed by many to be the one, who will eventually occupy the Saudi throne. But unlike the moderate Abdullah, Nayef is known to be a pro-Wahhabist and one of the most conservative members of the royal family – which has given many of the more tolerant elements in the Mideast cause for worry. 

In fact, according to a 2003 New York Times article, the Minister of the Interior’s promotion of extremist elements in the past was sufficiently extensive to sound the alarm in Washington and prompt US Senator Charles E. Schumer (Democrat of New York) to write a letter to then Saudi Ambassador to the United States, Prince Bandar, asking that Nayef be removed from office due to his “well-documented history of suborning terrorist financing and ignoring the evidence when it comes to investigating terrorist attacks on Americans.” 

If those, in the inner political circles are to be believed, the ‘leopard has not changed his spots.’ As a diplomat, well-acquainted with the inner workings of the Kingdom, who preferred (for obvious reasons) to remain anonymous, recently observed, “He (Nayef) is a conservative who will give more rope to the religious establishment than any of his brothers would,” which, if true, bodes ill for internal reforms and foreign relations, alike. 

Moreover, Abdullah’s ongoing reforms aimed at solving the country’s unemployment problems and curbing extremism by improving education, making it easier for women to work and retraining sharia judges, will probably be abandoned. 

Those reform programs appear to have already given the economy a jump-start. According to an article on the NASDAQ website, they have “opened up sectors of the economy previously barred to private investors, led to the privatization of some big state companies and included development of the capital markets.” 

Such improvements will most likely be stopped in their tracks if Nayef becomes king, because the prince has, since his appointment as interior minister, 35 years ago, gained a reputation for maintaining close ties with Wahhabists (a powerful group of religious extremists), who are strongly opposed to such changes. And as author Steffen Hertog, who wrote a book about Saudi internal politics, titledPrinces, Brokers and Bureaucrats, pointed out, Nayef has already obstructed some (economic) reforms in his role as Interior Minister. 

Nevertheless, there is little doubt that he will be the next king. “It looks more plausible than not that Nayef will become the crown prince after Abdullah dies and he is already taking more control in the day-to-day running of the kingdom,” Hertog observed. 

Institute for (Persian) Gulf Affairs (IGA) Director, Ali al-Ahmad, agrees. In a recent interview with Press TV, he said, “It is true that a name, Crown Prince Sultan, for example, is in Riyadh, but he is not meeting people and he is not issuing policy.” 

“It is the third man, Nayef, who is traveling and attending Arab Countries’ on the (Persian) Gulf meetings … He is the one, who is issuing policy and orders.” 

The official went on to explain that Abdullah, due to his age and infirmities (caused by his recent surgery), is out of the picture, and there are strong doubts as to whether Sultan, who is also elderly and suffers from poor health, will ever ascend the throne. So that leaves Nayef, who is actually running the country. Ahmed went on to say that he believes the prince will use the present circumstances to “spread his power and influence to make sure that he becomes the king of Saudi Arabia,” possibly, within a matter of months. 

But what will happen when – and if – this pro-Wahhabi prince actually does become king? 

Well, firstly, it will probably help strengthen the monarchy and the House of Saud among conservative Saudi elements. Within the past decades, the royal family has, on various occasions, drawn criticism from Sunni conservatives – not only for the excess of some of its members, but for attempts by several of its monarchs to introduce modernization and tolerance. 

Therefore, since much of the dynasty’s raison d’etre stems from its affiliation with Wahhabism and its role as the guardian of Sunni orthodoxy, a conservative, pro-Wahhabi king would, in the eyes of many Saudis, exonerate the House of Saud and entrench it more firmly than ever. 

At the same time, Nayef at the governmental helm would only serve to dash the hopes of both the country’s women and its Shia population. Shias, a long-suppressed minority in Saudi Arabia, could most likely anticipate further suppression – possibly to the point of persecution. And this treatment would be based on the prevalent political climate at a given time. If the Kingdom were embroiled in a conflict with Shias in another country, Shias in Saudi Arabia would probably feel the effects in a new wave of suppression and/or persecution. 

As far as Saudi women are concerned, the meager gains they have made du

ring Abdullah’s reign would most likely be forfeited. What else could they expect from a ruler, who, according to The Washington Institute for Near East Policy (a US think tank), publicly stated a month after King Abdullah’s announced appointment of the first female deputy minister, that he saw no need for either elections or female members of parliament? 

It might be mentioned at this point that Saudi Arabia, as an absolute monarchy, does not even possess a parliament. Instead it has a consultative ‘Shura Council,’ which is made up of exclusively male members appointed by the king. And the closest thing the Kingdom has ever had to elections, was a series of limited polls (for male participants, only), held in 2005 for some municipal councils. 

An ultra-conservative on the throne of the world’s biggest oil producer will also undoubtedly affect the country’s foreign relations, which will be felt first – and most strongly – throughout the already precarious Middle East. For starters, we can probably anticipate further Saudi interference in Iraq, Lebanon and Yemen, three countries, in which Shias have gained a foothold. 

On the other hand, there is a possibility that none of these scenarios will pan out. Despite Nayef’s hard-line reputation, historians say that Saudi leaders have always been pragmatists in their actual dealings, giving stability priority over ideology. 

And according to Hertog, Nayef’s conservatism is overstated. “As king you have to take different policy positions than as interior minister,” the expert said, “because you have a different constituency.” He went on to explain that Nayef’s opposition to reform “might have been due to security concerns and bureaucratic infighting rather than an ideological dispute.” 

There is a basis for such reasoning. Saudi Arabia is vulnerable security-wise, as assassinations and terrorist attempts in the past have demonstrated. And the rivalry and rifts within the royal family are well-known. 

So what will actually happen when Saudi Arabia gains a new king? We can only guess.

 

‘Coup may happen in Saudi Arabia’


JNN 18 Dec 2010 : A political analyst has said that a coup could happen in Saudi Arabia, with the health issues of the elderly monarch providing an opportunity for the plotters.

“It is possible that a coup could happen, and I see nothing to prevent that from happening,” Dr. Kamal Helbawy of the Center for the Study of Terrorism said in an interview with JNN on Saturday.

“Both in Qatar and Oman in the past, the sons of the kings stole the leadership from their fathers, and I think there is a rift in the house of Saud,” he added.

Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah was hospitalized in the United States on November 22 for a debilitating herniated disc, complicated by a hematoma that put pressure on his spine.

Saudi Health Minister Abdullah al-Rabeeah said the state of the monarch’s health was “very reassuring” following the first operation on his disc.

Earlier in the month, US surgeons performed another operation on the monarch’s back, which was reported to have gone smoothly.

“With his old age and sickness, there is suspicion about succession. There has been tension in the family for several decades. I believe there is a political and religious crisis,” Helbawy said.

King Abdullah has left his half-brother, Crown Prince Sultan bin Abdul-Aziz, who is thought to be suffering from cancer, at the helm.

The prolonged convalescence of the Saudi ruler has raised doubts about King Abdullah’s succession.

 

'Coup may happen in Saudi Arabia'


JNN 18 Dec 2010 : A political analyst has said that a coup could happen in Saudi Arabia, with the health issues of the elderly monarch providing an opportunity for the plotters.

“It is possible that a coup could happen, and I see nothing to prevent that from happening,” Dr. Kamal Helbawy of the Center for the Study of Terrorism said in an interview with JNN on Saturday.

“Both in Qatar and Oman in the past, the sons of the kings stole the leadership from their fathers, and I think there is a rift in the house of Saud,” he added.

Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah was hospitalized in the United States on November 22 for a debilitating herniated disc, complicated by a hematoma that put pressure on his spine.

Saudi Health Minister Abdullah al-Rabeeah said the state of the monarch’s health was “very reassuring” following the first operation on his disc.

Earlier in the month, US surgeons performed another operation on the monarch’s back, which was reported to have gone smoothly.

“With his old age and sickness, there is suspicion about succession. There has been tension in the family for several decades. I believe there is a political and religious crisis,” Helbawy said.

King Abdullah has left his half-brother, Crown Prince Sultan bin Abdul-Aziz, who is thought to be suffering from cancer, at the helm.

The prolonged convalescence of the Saudi ruler has raised doubts about King Abdullah’s succession.