American Policeman & British Catholic Preist Converts to Islam


British Catholic Preist Idris Tawfiq & US Cop William Converts to IslamJNN 23 Aug 2014 New York : My name is William, and I live in a large Midwestern city in the United States.
Continue reading

Advertisements

Islam flourishing steadily in African Country , Zambia


Zambian MosqueJNN 22 Nov 2013 : The Islamic faith is steadily growing in Zambia, with many new converts crediting the religion’s peaceful teachings for steering them away from vice and crime.

“Islam isn’t a complicated religion. Unlike other religions in Zambia, Islam is easy to master,” new convert Hanif Mumba told Anadolu Agency.

He asserted that many youths like himself had turned to Islam in hopes of attaining spiritual growth.

“In Islam, there aren’t complicated rituals; it’s based on discipline. Provided a person masters the art of pleasing Allah, he will then be happy,” Mumba said.

“I have come to learn that, in life, a person cannot do everything, because life is too short,” he noted.

“Islam teaches us to focus only on doing things that matter the most,” he added. “For me, the thing that matters most is doing the will of Allah every day of my life.”

Mumba is not alone.

Suzgo Zimba, president of the Islamic Supreme Council of Zambia, confirmed that many Zambians were embracing the Muslim faith.

As evidence, he cited the increasing number of prayer areas being converted into mosques for congregational Muslim Friday prayers.

Zimba told AA that, in order for a prayer area to be converted into a Friday prayer mosque, it must serve more than forty households.

In Zambia, a standard household has at least six family members, if not more. Therefore, only a mosque that can accommodate at least 240 people is allowed to host Friday prayers.

Chawama, a township in capital Lusaka, has six mosques that have been approved to host Friday prayers, meaning the area contains no less than 1,440 Muslims.

“We have many mosques in Zambia that have been turned into Friday prayer centers,” Zimba noted.

“We have at least four mosques in every urban township across the country that have been turned into Friday prayer centers,” the Muslim leader asserted.

“The situation is also the same in rural townships,” he added, calling the steadily rising numbers of Friday mosques an “unprecedented development.”

“In every district across the country, mosques are being constructed to enable people to gather for prayers,” said Zimba. “This shows the rate at which Islam is growing in Zambia.”

He went on to note that young people constituted the majority of the country’s new mosque-goers.

“In mosques founded in towns, you find more youths attending prayers than elderly people,” he explained. “This shows that the Muslim population in Zambia is composed largely of youths.”

According to the US State Department’s International Religious Freedom Report for 2012, Muslims make up roughly 1 percent of Zambia’s total population of 13.1 million.

Discipline

Other youths interviewed by AA from different mosques in Lusaka and surrounding areas said they had been attracted to Islam because it is a religion of “many virtues,” designed to instill discipline in its adherents.

Musa Phiri, a 23-year-old Muslim convert from Bread of Life, a Lusaka-based Christian denomination, says Islam teaches people to combat selfish desires and temptations.

This, he believes, can lead a person to become a role model in society.

Phiri, who attends Friday prayers at the LICEF Center in Lusaka, explains that, like many other religions, Islam prescribes certain dos and don’ts regarding dress, social norms, culture and diet.

“At times, these tenets and teachings can be difficult to adhere to, but once you are used to practicing them, you are assured of a good change for life,” he told AA. “This in itself is what we call discipline.”

According to Phiri, Islam instructs young people to be grateful for every aspect of life, encouraging them to pray and seek guidance whenever selfish desires arise.

“Since I became a Muslim, I have made it my business to tell friends about my newfound faith to encourage them to develop courage and foresight,” he asserted.

“I think this will help in shaping the future of their communities,” added Phiri, who was himself drawn to Islam through interaction with Muslim classmates at school.

Adams Musole, a new convert who attends Friday prayers at the Chaisa Mosque in Chawama, stressed that Islam discouraged followers from spending time in unhealthy environments.

His imam, he recalled, had recently advised him to steer clear of surroundings that might negatively affect his new faith.

“Following these directives, I have developed a healthy friendship – not only with my friends, but with the environment as well,” 25-year-old Musole told AA.

He added: “I can now proudly call myself a ‘moderate’ Muslim.”

Musole, who prior to his conversion to Islam had been a member of the Seventh Day Adventist Church, says that reading the holy Quran had influenced him to embrace Islam.

Aisha Lengwe, another recent convert, was raised and baptized in a Catholic family and bore the Christian name Catherine.

She was introduced to Islam by her friends, who frequently told stories about Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him).

Even before her conversion, Lengwe says she had been overwhelmed by a sense of internal tranquility.

“When I first embraced Islam, I didn’t really think it was going to affect my life very much,” the 23-year-old told AA. “I was wrong.”

According to Lengwe, most of her family did not immediately approve of her decision, thinking her conversion to Islam was not a good idea.

“Some of my Christian friends felt I betrayed them when I joined Islam. As a result, they have isolated me,” she said.

“On days like this, I prefer staying home to read the Qur’an rather than going out with friends, because in the time I spend reading the holy Qur’an, I see the benefits of being a Muslim covert,” Lengwe added.

Although it took her months to explain her new faith to her family, Aisha is happy that she eventually patched things up with her father.

Unlike other converts who are afraid to practice Islamic rituals in front of non-Muslim relatives, Lengwe is free to live the life of a good Muslim anywhere.

She hopes her family will gradually become more receptive to her change of faith.

Hanif Mumba, 37, became a Muslim because he wanted to be part of a bigger family and contribute to its growth.

“Focusing on doing things that will not please Allah will earn a person everlasting fire,” he told AA.

“That’s why a person… should focus on doing good things that will please Allah,” he added. “And this is what I have been doing in my five years as a Muslim.”

 

Nigerian Movie Actress embraces Islam


Nigerain Movie Star Lizzy Anjorin embraces IslamJNN 6 Nov 2013 Abuja : Jolting millions of her fans, Nigerian screen diva Lizzy Anjorin has officially Embraced Islam, a religion she told OnIslam.net had always been her favorite from childhood but which she could not practice in deference to her father who was a Christian. Continue reading

US Latino’s exploring their roots , resulting Latino conversion to Islam on the Rise


Hispanic American Muslims conversion on the rise.

JNN 15 Oct 2103 Florida : Just as the U.S. Latino population is on the rise – Hispanics are now the nation’s largest minority – so is the number of Latino Muslims. And it’s not just a result of Arab Latin Americans emigrating to the United States.

According to organizations like WhyIslam.org, Latinos are one of the fastest growing segments of the Muslim community. About six percent of U.S. Muslims are now Latino – and as many as a fifth of new converts to Islam nationwide are Latino.

The American Muslim Association of North America, based in North Miami, says heavily Hispanic South Florida in particular is home to a rising number of Latino Muslims.

Not that conversion to Islam is easy in Latino society, as Marina Gonzalez knows. A Nicaraguan-American nurse in Miami, Gonzalez converted five years ago and wears the hijab, the Muslim women’s head garb. At first her family stopped talking to her.

“They [were] calling me Talibana,” Gonzalez recalls. “My mother, she didn’t like to go [out] with me because I wear the hijab.”

But now her mother “understands. When I go to my parents’ house they turn off the TV when I have to pray. I’m so happy.”

Najib Sowma’s first name was Dario before he converted six years ago. Today he’s a leading member of the Al-Ihsaan mosque in South Miami-Dade. But his Cuban mother was initially shocked.

“Now her views have changed,” says Sowma. “Prior to me being Muslim to who I am now, she sees a big difference in my character.”

If it’s a surprise that many Latinos are moving from a predominantly Roman Catholic culture to an originally Arab faith, perhaps it shouldn’t be. For one thing, like African-Americans in the 1960s, Latinos are discovering their own historical and cultural ties to Islam and the Arab world. And that starts with what most defines Latinos: Spanish.

“Our language is nurtured by more than 4,000 words that come from Arabic,” says Wilfredo Ruiz, a Puerto Rican-born Muslim who converted a decade ago and is a lawyer for the South Florida chapter of the Council of American-Islamic Relations. “Every word in Spanish that starts with ‘al,’ for example, like alcalde, alcantarilla, almohada.”

That’s because Arab Muslims ruled Spain for some 800 years during the Middle Ages – and made the Iberian Peninsula one of the most advanced civilizations of its time. A millennium later, Ruiz says that past is an inescapable part of the Hispanic DNA.

“What most Latinos who have embraced Islam find most amazing is their cultural affinity to the Muslim culture,” says Ruiz. “It’s like rediscovering your past. That area of our past has been hidden from us.”

Ruiz points out that both Latinos and Arabs highly value the extended family and traditions like offering hospitality to strangers. In religious terms, Latinos like Gonzalez say Islam provides a simpler, more direct form of worship than Catholicism does. They also feel more structure than they see in the evangelical churches so many Latinos join today.

“The connection I have with God now is better than before,” says Gonzalez.

Yet many take comfort in the overlap between Catholicism and Islam. Muslims, for example, venerate the Virgin Mary as well as Jesus, at least as a prophet.

“At the beginning when I was reading the Quran I said, “Oh, [Muslims] believe in the hereafter, in angels,’” says Liliana Parodi, a Peruvian-American surgical technician in Miami who converted 24 years ago. “You know, it’s not so much difference.”

More Latina women convert to Islam than Latino men do. Islam is admittedly questioned for its segregation of women. But Latinas like Parodi say it’s hypocritical for a male-dominated Catholic Church – which forbids women priests, birth control and divorce – and an ultra-macho Latino society – whose Spanish-language television networks still portray women as spitfire sexpots – to criticize their new faith in that regard.

“I tell them, ‘Look at yourself,’” says Parodi. “The sad part is [when they] see women as objects.”

A decade ago, the nation’s image of a Latino Muslim was unfortunately Jose Padilla, the so-called “Dirty Bomber” who was convicted for aiding terrorists. But for Ruiz, who was also a Navy chaplain, much has changed since then – and Latinos are less fearful now of converting.

“They soon come to learn that [Muslims] abhor violence,” Ruiz says. “We have the same aspirations for social justice as a Christian or a Jew does.”

Which means, as Eid al-Adha arrives next Monday evening, more Latinos will be saying “Eid Mubarak.” Which is Arabic for “Eid Bendito.” Which is Spanish for “Have a Blessed Eid.”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Famous French singer 'Diam -Melanie Georgiades' embraces Islam, wears hijab


JNN 04 Oct 2012 Paris : Famous French singer Diam’s has announced in a newly-published autobiography that she has embraced Islam and decided to wear hijab.Amid a nationwide debate in France surrounding attitudes towards the Islamic veil, or hijab, a French rapper, has surprised fans by announcing her conversion to Islam and choosing to wear a headscarf. Continue reading

Famous French singer ‘Diam -Melanie Georgiades’ embraces Islam, wears hijab


JNN 04 Oct 2012 Paris : Famous French singer Diam’s has announced in a newly-published autobiography that she has embraced Islam and decided to wear hijab.Amid a nationwide debate in France surrounding attitudes towards the Islamic veil, or hijab, a French rapper, has surprised fans by announcing her conversion to Islam and choosing to wear a headscarf. Continue reading